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February 27, 2014

WILDCOAST TO CARRY OUT FIRST EVER CALIFORNIA COASTAL FLOODWATCH

Imperial Beach, February 27, 2014
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Forecasted significant wave heights in the developing storm offshore of Southern California on Friday, February 28th

WILDCOAST TO CARRY OUT FIRST EVER CALIFORNIA COASTAL FLOODWATCH TO DOCUMENT SHORELINE IMPACTS FROM UPCOMING SWELL AND WEATHER EVENT

Coastal Organization to use Citizen Scientists and Social Media to Report Impacts of 15-18’ Surf Forecasted this Weekend on Public Infrastructure, Beaches, Marine Protected Areas and Coastal Property

 

With a historic storm and swell forecast to hit California this weekend, WILDCOAST, a coastal conservation organization, is using the power of social media to harness citizen scientists to document coastal flooding.

“Just recently with King Tides and moderate surf, we experienced coastal flooding. This historic storm will produce the largest surf we have seen this winter along much of the Southern California coast,” said WILDCOAST Executive Director Dr. Serge Dedina. “We are asking our conservation partners and citizens to share photos and video of coastal flooding by using the hashtag #coastalfloodwatch across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram while recording date, time, and location along with any observations.”

WILDCOAST is using data to provide information on coastal flooding to assist the research of scientists such as Dr. Timu Gallien and Dr. Robert Guza of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography who are monitoring and documenting coastal flooding impacts in San Diego County as part of a larger research effort.

Citizens who use social media and participate in this project are asked to stay safe and take precautions.

WILDCOAST has already carried out a photo transect of the Tijuana River Valley along the U.S.-Mexico Border to be able to illustrate the impacts of flooding during and after the storm.

“With the issue of sea level rise and increasingly powerful ocean storms that create high waves, strong wind and storm surge, it is more important than ever to understand how these events impact our coast and more importantly how we can adapt,” said Dedina.  “The more we know, the more we can prepare for the future.” 

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The Surfline nearshore swell models displays the large surf on Saturday, March 1st with face sizes in excess of 15’ in some of the more exposed areas of the South Bay. 
 

Storm surf forecast models courtesy of Surfline.com