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June 18, 2012

CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA Assists with Habitat Restoration in the Otay Valley Regional Park

Troop 5912 and WiLDCOAST are grateful for the support of Anna Maria Chavez
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Anna Maria Chavez plants a Sycamore Tree in the Otay Valley Regional Park with Ranger Barone and Troop 5912

On June 16th Anna Maria Chavez, the first Latina CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA, visited San Diego and helped WiLDCOAST and Irene Baraja’s Troop 5912 complete a habitat restoration event in the Otay Valley Regional Park. This event, with the assistance of the CEO, was the result of 6 months of hard work, eradicating ice plant from the park. This restoration project was coordinated by WiLDCOAST and the OVRP, and undertaken as part of the Girl’s 100 Year Anniversary Celebration in order to earn a trip to Washington D.C.

We are very fortunate and grateful that Ms. Chavez attended THIS service activity, as thousands of other Girl Scouts have been hosting service projects throughout San Diego County. Ms. Chavez spoke in front of 60 girls and their parents, TV cameras and reporters, and County Supervisor Cox, San Diego Councilman Alvarez, and Chula Vista Councilwoman Bensoussan.

70 native plants, most of which were donated by CA State Parks, were planted on site during the event with the guidance of WiLDCOAST and OVRP Park Rangers. The Troop has committed to watering the plants throughout the summer to ensure their survival. If you’d like to volunteer to help with the watering process please contact AJ Schneller at 619.423.8665 x210. A big thanks goes out to the parents of the girls for providing food and refreshments, and CA State Parks and Terra Bella Nursery for donating the native plants.

WiLDCOAST is dedicated to ecological restoration, environmental education, and promoting healthy recreational opportunities in the open space gem known as the Otay Valley Regional Park. In the last four years WiLDCOAST has faciliated dozens of public events in the park in order to enhance community stewardship opportunities and ecological restoration for the unique species of the Otay River Valley.