Sign Up for Our Newsletter! »

June 27, 2013

Workshop on Sea Turtles

Barra de la Cruz, Oaxaca
Medium_image

This week, WiLDCOAST will be holding a workshop called “Sea Turtles and Barra de la Cruz” in an elementary school called, “Víctor Bravo Ahuja”, located in the coastal community of Barra de la Cruz in Oaxaca, Mexico. 

 

The objective of this workshop is to strengthen the knowledge of biology and conservation of sea turtles, and to make children aware of the importance of Barra de la Cruz on a global level. The beaches in this community are important nesting sites for Leatherback sea turtles, which are the largest turtle species in the world. Also, Barra de la Cruz has been a designated RAMSAR site, which identifies it as a wetland of international importance and an extremely important ecological resource. These ecosystems are important for biodiversity conservation, you can see more at www.ramsar.conanp.gob.mx. Lastly, the beach of Barra de la Cruz is an important place to practice surfing as demonstrated in the “Global Wave Conference 3” which is a global event held this year in Rosarito. Mexico.  Barra de la Cruz was one of the case studies and focuses of the conference, as it is an ecologically important area that provides multiple world-class surfing spots.

 

The result of the workshop was a series of posters made by students in which they invite us to see this beautiful community and its ecological wealth through their budding artistic skills.

 

Thank you very much to Director Alonso García Rustrian and Pablo Narvaez for their support for this workshop.

June 27, 2013, Los Angeles, CA) A new poll of 600 southern California Latinos showed surprisingly high percentages of support for a wide array of pro-environmental policies including decisive preferences for clean energy sources versus fossil fuel sources.

 

 "We have detected sympathetic attitudes among Latino voters towards aspects of the traditional environmental agenda in particular water and air quality, as well as more green space,” said Antonio Gonzalez, William Velasquez Institute president.

 

A memo detailing more explicit findings is attached and the full survey may be found onwww.wcvi.org.